Posts Tagged slaw

VeganMoFo: Dyspepsia Diet Stage II

Stage II of my dyspepsia diet allowed me to add certain foods back in, like high-fiber foods, beans and seeds.  I still had to avoid the big aggravators like caffeine, alcohol, spicy foods and fatty foods, as well as the more acidic fruits and veggies, but there was a lot more freedom of choice than stage I.

I was missing cruciferous veggies after a few days of not allowing them in stage I, so I doubled up with this Soba Slaw from Quick-Fix Vegan.  In addition to soba noodles, it calls for cabbage, carrot, cilantro, ginger and peanuts.  I left out the scallions, and substituted raw red bell pepper and plain yogurt for the vinegar and oil called for in the dressing.  I also added shelled edamame and blanched romanesco to make it a nicely filling meal that was gentle enough on my stomach.

I had a bunch of random vegetables to use up, so I made this melange of brown rice, kidney beans, mushrooms, celery, spinach, zucchini and parsley, with sprouts and avocado.

Baked tofu sandwich with a tiny smear of reduced-fat Vegenaise, lettuce, and sprouts, with pan seared (no oil) squash and zucchini.

Since most of the foods in stage I had been soft, I was missing some crunch in my life.  I tried these Kettle Bakes chips, which were a new product at the time.  I really like them!  You get the satisfaction of a salty munchy snack without all the fat, and the texture is nice and crisp.

I was also missing my morning pick-me-up, so I tried dandelion tea.  It didn’t trick me into thinking I was enjoying anything close to coffee, but in its own way it was good.  The closest thing I can think of to compare to its flavor is toast.  So yes, toasted bread tea.  This was what I had instead of my precious caffeine.

Lastly, the reflux cookbook Dropping Acid had said specifically that beets were good for those with too much acid in their bellies, so I got a can of ‘em.  Just cooked beets, not pickled!  They went well alongside this chickpea salad with carrot, celery, and a yogurt-based dill dressing.

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Thanksgiving 2012 – Main Course

My goal this year was to post about Thanksgiving dinner earlier than I did last year, which was in January.  That obviously did not happen!  Still, it was a great meal that I want to show you.  You can read about the appetizers here.

We don’t normally get too crazy with decorating the mantle, but I got inspired by Pinterest to make a wreath, with a lot of help from this felt flower tutorial.  I think it turned out really cute!

For the side dishes we stayed pretty traditional, changing things up just a bit from the year before.

We like our smashed potatoes chunky with the skins on, and add garlic, Earth Balance and almond milk.  I sprinkled on some minced chives before serving.

Dave made his most excellent stuffing with sourdough bread, shiitake broth, fresh portobello, and lots of herbs.

As a light counterpoint, I made this Green Cabbage and Red Apple Slaw.  I used kale instead of the brussels sprouts called for, and soaked the red onion to cut some of the rawness.  I really liked this salad but don’t know that everyone else loved it.  I think the raw greens and vinegar might be a little too bitter if you’re not used to them, even though the apple was nicely sweet.

Dave wanted something a little different than the usual green bean casserole, so I chose Lemony Green Beans with Almond Breadcrumbs.  This was really tasty, even though I tripled the recipe and the beans didn’t cook evenly since there were so many in the pot.

To our usual canned corn, I added minced sauteed shallot, red bell pepper, and fresh oregano.  I cooked it gently to keep the flavors mellow and buttery.

The recipe that took by far the most effort and time, but was so, so worth it, was Herbed Focaccia from veganbaking.net.

Look at those air pockets!  This was easily the best bread I’ve ever baked, but boy does it take a long time to make.  You make the herbed olive oil, mix the dough, shape, stretch, fold and rest three times (at 30 minutes each), rise for one hour, refrigerate twelve hours, rest three hours, rise three hours, and FINALLY, you bake!  Good things come to those who wait with this bread, and the flavor and texture were perfect.  If I can make this without screwing up, so can you!

I served the bread with caramelized onion butter, which was just Earth Balance blended with caramelized Cipollini onions.  It was delicious and sweet, but it melted everywhere by the end of dinner since the room was warm…

My entree was Trader Joe’s Turkey-less Stuffed Roast with Gravy.  I had bought the roast a few weeks before on a whim ($9.99 is a great price) and didn’t necessarily plan to have it for Thanksgiving dinner, but that’s how it worked out.  Luckily, I really liked the roast!  It’s similar to the Tofurky roast but maybe a bit more tender.  The gravy was a little sweet for my tastes, but still went nicely with the smashed potatoes.

The second best part about Thanksgiving?  Leftovers!  You better believe I had almost this exact same plate a few more times.  I also made great sandwiches with the focaccia, roast, cranberry sauce, and Vegenaise.

Next up, desserts.  Hopefully I’ll post before three months from now!

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Review: The Dairy-Free & Gluten-Free Kitchen

When I was offered a copy of The Dairy-Free & Gluten-Free Kitchen for review, I wasn’t sure if I should accept.  It’s not a vegan book, not even vegetarian, and even though the recipes were dairy-free they could still contain eggs, which can be hard to replace in gluten-free recipes.  I looked into the author, Denise Jardine, and found out that she lives in the Bay Area and has worked at Whole Foods as a Healthy Eating Specialist.  And, I figured the publisher wouldn’t offer me a copy unless they thought I’d like it, so I signed on.

And I’m glad I did!  I don’t need to eat gluten-free, but I do sometimes coincidentally by eating a whole food vegan diet, and I certainly sympathize with those who do need to eschew gluten for medical reasons.  The Dairy-Free & Gluten-Free Kitchen is a great book to show anyone who might be worried about cutting out gluten that it can be done.  There is a chapter on basics like gluten-free flour mix, milk alternatives, beans and whole grains, and other sections for breakfast, small bites, salads and dressings, soups, vegetarian and companion dishes, sauces and spreads, yeasted and quick breads, sweet endings, and meat and fish dishes.  Vegetarians beware – there are pictures of meat and fish dishes sprinkled throughout those sections.

The first dish that caught my eye was Oyster Mushrooms Rockefeller.  For some reason I assumed the recipe wouldn’t be vegetarian, but it was completely vegan as written!  To turn it into a meal, I also made the Spicy Roasted Cauliflower.

The Oysters Mushrooms Rockefeller was really interesting and tasty.  You layer oyster mushrooms, wilted spinach and seasoned gluten-free bread crumbs, then top it off with a cashew cream.  The recipe calls for making bread crumbs from homemade gluten-free bread, but I had some store bought gf bread in the freezer so I just used that.

While the flavor of the overall dish was fantastic, I would change up the method a bit next time.  The mushrooms and spinach go in basically unseasoned, then the very flavorful bread crumb mixture went on top, so unless you got a bite with every layer it was a little unbalanced.  I would add a pinch of salt to the mushrooms and spinach, and maybe mix some of the breadcrumbs through, and then I think it would be really outstanding.

The Spicy Roasted Cauliflower was good, and also included carrots, potato and onion.  It was a basic roasted vegetable dish with curry powder and other spices, with some gf bread crumbs tossed in for crunch.

Next I wanted to veganize one of the meat dishes, since I figured it was a shame to skip over two whole chapters.  I chose the first recipe listed, Poached Cod Over Glass Noodles, because it sounded really healthy and flavorful.  My plan was to substitute tofu, although I wasn’t sure how well braised tofu would work out.

The answer is that braised tofu can be amazing.  You can’t really tell from the picture, but this tofu was so flavorful.  The broth was hearty, sweet, sour and pungent, with flavors from tomatoes, date syrup, lemongrass and ginger.  The bean thread noodles were a great textural complement, and while the bok choy was tricky to cut into, it made for a nice presentation.

I figured in order to do the book justice, I ought to try one of the breads using the gluten-free flour mix.  Many of the bread recipes do have eggs, so I attempted to veganize the Sweet Potato Cornbread.  I rounded out the meal with the Spicy Green Smoothie and the Sweet and Tangy Jicama Slaw.

I served the Spicy Green Smoothie as a cold soup, which worked out nicely.  It was light, refreshing and spicy, but also smooth from avocado.  The Jicama Slaw was crunchy and tasty, with cabbage, carrot, red bell pepper and a dairy-free mayonnaise based dressing.  I wouldn’t really say that I got the “sweet and tangy” part though, I thought the dressing could’ve been a little more flavorful.  Maybe it just seemed that way because I was having it with the spicy smoothie though.

The Sweet Potato Cornbread worked out pretty well, considering it was gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free AND sugar-free.  Right after baking it was pretty squishy and had a soft, dense texture, but after sitting overnight it firmed up a bit and felt more like “normal” cornbread.

Even though it’s not a vegan cookbook, I’m happy to have The Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free Kitchen in my arsenal.  While some of the recipes are quite basic (I don’t think you need a recipe to make gf French toast if you know that gf bread exists), some of the recipes are really interesting and quite delicious.  I would definitely recommend the book to anyone seeking whole foods based dairy-free and gluten-free recipes.

Disclaimer:  I received a free copy of this book for review purposes.  The words, opinions and photos here are entirely my own.

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VeganMoFo: OBR Week – FatFree Vegan Kitchen

FatFree Vegan Kitchen is one of the blogs I’ve been reading the longest, practically since I first went vegan way back when.  Susan cooks without any added oil, although some of her recipes do include fats such as nuts and avocados.  Completely oil-free cooking is somewhat foreign to me, but I do love a low-fat recipe made using whole ingredients.  In addition to posting her own recipes, Susan maintains a database of oil-free vegan recipes submitted by others.

I chose two recipes from the blog which I thought would go well together, Green Curry Tofu Cakes and Bean Sprouts and Broccoli Slaw Salad with Coconut-Ginger Dressing.

You start the tofu cakes by soaking arame and chia seeds, which give a seafood-ish flavor and bind the cakes, respectively.  Then you mix together tofu, nutritional yeast, tamari, green curry paste and quinoa flakes or quick oats and form ‘em into patties.  My tofu was extra-extra-firm and I actually had to add a little more liquid to get the mixture to blend, but even then it was very easy to handle.  There is an option to bread the patties which would have been good, but I skipped it both to save on calories and avoid an extra step.  As suggested, I served the cakes with horseradish-spiked ketchup, which was a great idea.  The ketchup actually overpowered the mildly flavored cakes a bit; I could’ve used more green curry flavor and would add even more next time.

The absolute stand out of this meal was the coconut-ginger salad dressing.  If my face fit in the blender I would have licked it clean.  The balance of toasted coconut, ginger, sweet, salty and sour from tamarind concentrate was perfect.  The salad itself was very simple.  I used shredded cabbage in place of the broccoli slaw just because I had a whole head in the fridge.

If you haven’t checked out FatFree Vegan Kitchen’s recipes yet, take a look!  Susan really knows what she’s doing with flavors, and she makes oil-free cooking delicious.

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Random Meals & Laptop Lunches

I feel like I lost my cooking mojo there for a few weeks in July and had a hard time figuring out what to eat, so I have no theme for this post.  The theme is random!

What does one do when one has leftover filling from tomato-basil-mozzarella sandwiches but no bread?

One makes tomato-basil-mozzarella bites.  Yum!

This is a secret risotto that I tested for a friend to submit to a recipe contest.

CSA delivery…

Corn, yellow onions, peppers & lettuce mix

Grapes, red onions, peaches, tomatoes, cherries & an eggplant

I like eggplant but don’t always like cooking it.  It seems like most eggplant cooking techniques use a lot of oil, so I wanted to do something different.

My solution was eggplant and lentil curry.  This had a whole can of light coconut milk in it, so it wasn’t exactly low fat anyway…but I tried!

Thinking back, I don’t really know why I did this, but I made a little slaw to go with the curry.  This had carrot, celery and broccoli stalk and a Vegennaise-based dressing.  (Again, so much for keeping the meal low-fat!)  Oh, I think I made it cause I had broccoli stems that needed using…

I wanted to make a salsa with the corn and tomatoes, so I made some mostly-raw lettuce tacos.  On the bottom is seasoned black beans, them lime-marinated mushrooms, corn salsa and fresh cilantro.  These were very tasty but very messy to eat, because the fancy lettuce at TJ’s looks like it would be good for lettuce wraps, but in reality was decidedly not.  In the back are TJ’s corn-flax chips, which are slightly addicting.

I got a spiralizer!  I’ve been jealous of other blogger’s zucchini noodles for far too long, so I finally bought one.

…and made zucchini and squash noodles.  I used the larger noodle shredder the first time, and they were a bit too large and super curly.  The blade with the smaller holes is much better for this purpose.

I had fresh basil in the fridge and I was feeling too lazy to make a raw sauce, so I went the easy route and added spaghetti sauce, basil, toasted pine nuts and almond parmesan.  This was very tasty!  The sauce separates and gets watery if it sits with the zucchini, so I want to try a different type of sauce next time.

This is a Saturday afternoon clean-out-the-kitchen salad.  It has red potatoes, purple potatoes, cucumber, red bell pepper, celery, carrot and sliced veggie dog, with a Vegennaise dressing.  It wasn’t the most fantastic thing I’ve ever eaten, but it was pretty and it got the job done.

Farmers market purchases:  rainbow chard, okra, baby cucumbers, jalapenos, peaches and nectarines, a golden and regular zucchini, a lemon, broccoli and strawberries.  All for under $20!

The main purpose of my farmers market trip was to get ingredients to make my Southern Style Dolmades for a potluck that night.  I ran late and didn’t have time to assemble the rolls, so I just took the filling and the sauce and hoped it would be okay.  Turns out people really liked it as it was!  That was a big relief.

I realized while at the market that I hadn’t had anything with cheesy sauce for a long time (such a travesty), so I bought the broccoli with plans to make this:

Shells n’ cheese n’ broccoli.  You can’t beat it.  I used my favorite cheesy sauce, which is tofu based, but I used the wrong kind of tofu and eyeballed the ingredients and so it didn’t turn out the best it ever has, but it still hit the spot.

To go with my pasta, I roasted the okra.  Look at the size of these okras!  They are with a regular sized golden zucchini and jalapeno for reference.

All roasted up.

I still had the chard leaves from my non-roll making debacle and hadn’t a clue what to do with them since they were already boiled.  So I asked The PPK for ideas, and one member suggested peanut sauce.  Bingo!  Peanut sauce makes everything better.  I still ended up making rolls, but went a different direction with the filling.

So these are quinoa, pepper, carrot and zucchini chard rolls with fresh cilantro, basil and peanut sauce.  It was very yummy!  I was glad I could salvage my $4 worth of boiled organic chard.

I won’t be using my laptop lunchbox for a reason to be discussed in my next post, so I’ll catch up with lunches.  Most of them are repeats from the meals above anyway.

7/14 the aforementioned secret risotto, steamed broccoli,
carrot sticks, grapes & cherries

7/16 potato & fava bean salad with miso-mustard dressing,
roasted asparatus, sweet potato-chocolate chip-
walnut muffin, strawberries & raspberries

7/21 broccoli/carrot slaw, eggplant curry, brown rice,
oat bran pretzel sticks, wasabi-soy almonds, figs

7/22 lettuce wraps with seasoned black beans, marinated mushrooms,
corn salsa & cilantro, corn-flax chips, dark chocolate

7/24 zucchini noodles with spaghetti sauce, pine nuts & almond
parmesan, beanballs, maple cookie, b-complex supplement

7/27 clean-out-the-kitchen salad with lettuce & avocado, strawberries

7/28 shells & cheese & broccoli, roasted okra, gf corn muffin, strawberries

7/30 chard rolls with peanut sauce, celery, soy nuggets
with ketchup, dried figs, dark chocolate

7/31 leftover quinoa filling with peanut sauce, zucchini noodles with spaghetti sauce & almond parmesan, cherries, gherkins, sandwich cookies

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Whole Wheat Oatmeal Molasses Bread for a BLT

The plan was to make oatmeal bread today, the real way, albeit with the use of my bread machine.  If I had started it when I woke up it would’ve been ready in time for lunch.  But I forgot.  Luckily for me, while looking through my recipe files I found a non-yeasted quick bread style oatmeal molasses bread that seemed well suited for my purpose.  I halved it for one loaf, veganized it and changed some ingredients to ones I preferred, and it turned out really well.  The flavor is especially good and hearty, the inside is soft and moist, and the crust is, well, crusty.  I can’t wait to have it as toast tomorrow morning.

oatmeal molasses bread

I think next time I’ll try baking it in a loaf pan for a less wonky shape.  Also, an “egg wash” or some water might help the oats stick to the top.

Whole Wheat Oatmeal Molasses Bread

1 Tbs lemon juice
1 scant cup non-dairy milk
1/4 cup regular oats
1 Tbs oil
2 Tbs molasses
1 Tbs agave nectar
1 cup whole wheat flour
1 1/4 cups whole wheat pastry flour
3/4 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 Tbs yellow cornmeal
1/2 Tbs regular oats

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, or grease a loaf pan.
2. Pour the lemon juice into a cup measure then fill the rest of the cup with the milk. Let stand to curdle.
3. Combine the next 4 ingredients (oats through agave nectar) in a small bowl. Add the milk mixture and stir.
4. Combine flours, salt, baking powder and baking soda in a medium bowl. Make a well in center of mixture.
5. Add milk mixture to flour mixture, stirring just until moist. Let rest 1-2 minutes.
6. Turn dough onto a lightly floured surface. The dough will be tacky. With floured hands, knead for 1 minute adding extra flour as needed. Dust the baking sheet or loaf pan with cornmeal. Shape the dough into a loaf and place on sheet or in pan. Make 3 diagonal slits across top of the loaf with a sharp knife. Sprinkle oats on top of loaf and gently press them down.
7. Bake at 400 degrees for 20 minutes. Reduce temperature to 375 and bake an additional 15 minutes or until bottom of loaf sounds hollow when tapped. Let stand 15 minutes before slicing.

Yields: 1 loaf.

While the bread was cooling and the Fakin’ Bacon was cooking, I made a slaw.  I wanted a fat-free dressing since I was going to put Vegennaise on my sandwich, and it ended up being a spicy mustard cumin lime dressing.  Since my flavors were heading south of the border, I added some pickled jalapenos that were sitting in the fridge.  Joanna from Yellow Rose Recipes turned me on to pickled jalapenos, and now I heart them.

slaw

I wanted to put sliced avocado on my BLT, but the avocado I bought three days ago still isn’t ripe.  It was delicious anyhow.  The bread was so flavorful it almost overshadowed the fillings!

blt

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